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29 High Street

29 High Street

29 High Street

Photo courtesy of the Hingham Historical Society Collection.

Thomas Jones House

1835

There was a big change at 29 High Street when the current owners moved in:  they were not named Jones.  For 166 years, the descendants of Thomas Jones had lived in the house he built in 1835.

Thomas Jones was a blacksmith who made harpoons and blubber hooks for whalers in addition to horseshoes and other household products.  Ralph Jones, his grandson, was a toy maker who worked in the old blacksmith shop. In 1970 E. Gardner Jones, a lay minister, became a Justice of the Peace. He married over 2,000 couples at the 29 High Street house. The current owners have met many people who tell them that their parents were married in the front room or by the pine tree in the back yard.

The house is a traditional cape with two rooms on either side of the front door with a curved stairway leading to the second floor.  An early addition connected the house to the barn and included a kitchen, a place to stock wood, and a 3-hole latrine. Over the years the 3-holer became a porch.

The current owners demolished this earlier addition to create a terrific modern kitchen, eating area, dining room, back entryway, and basement.  Being lovers of antique homes the owners did everything to keep the old cape intact, used all old wood, exposed many beams and created a delightful mix of old and new that makes the home feel open and warm.

During the construction the floorboards in the old basement were removed so that cement could be poured.  To the surprise of the owners and the Jones that still live locally there were hundreds of bottles under the boards.  It is still a mystery; all are wondering which Jones put them there and why.

This photo pictures 29 High Street in the mid-20th century and shows the old structure connecting barn to house. The entrance into the basement of the barn, at left, indicates that it was a type of bank barn, suitable for entering on two levels. Manure could be easily removed from the basement, while dairy cows could be kept clean and dry on the main level.

This photo pictures 29 High Street in the mid-20th century and shows the old structure connecting barn to house. The entrance into the basement of the barn, at left, indicates that it was a type of bank barn, suitable for entering on two levels. Manure could be easily removed from the basement, while dairy cows could be kept clean and dry on the main level.

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